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  • Chickenless chicken meat

    Posted by simon c on 2008 April 25日 Friday

    The urban legend:

    Claim: KFC no longer use the word ‘chicken’ to describe its product because it serves meat from genetically engineered animals that the government will no longer permit to be referred to as ‘chickens.’

    Status: False.

    But it looks like it’s going to become true in the near future, through a PETA contest no less:

    It’s no freakier or more far-fetched than what you’ve been hearing from politicians about stem cells and what they can do for people. Scientists aren’t even allowed to try a stem-cell experiment in people till it works in animals. That’s all PETA is asking for: “animal stem cells that would be placed in a medium to grow and reproduce.”
    To put it crudely, if you can grow a hunk of flesh for transplant, you can grow it for food.
    If this idea repels you as a carnivore, imagine how it feels to a vegetarian. PETA co-founder Ingrid Newkirk tells the New York Times that the prize offer caused “a near civil war in our office” and that “we will have members leave us over this.” Newkirk observes, “In any social cause community, there are people who strive for purity.”

    But vegetarians who feel morally superior to the masses have to make silly points like this, which totally puts their intelligence into question:

    Purists see it as a moral surrender. “It’s our job to introduce the philosophy and hammer it home that animals are not ours to eat,” a dissident PETA official tells the Times. Purists also point out that carnivores suffer more obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. Getting your meat from stem cells might not change that.

    (Emphasis mine.)

    It’s very difficult to eat vegetarian, let alone vegan, here in Japan because there are meat and fish products and byproducts in virtually every dish. But Japanese population as a whole is much healthier, thinner, and have live longer than Americans. And Japanese people absolutely love fatty meat and fish. Marbled steak and fatty tuna are highly prized, expensive, and very tasty. The difference is that people in Japan eat less than Americans, the difference in portions is immediately noticeable to anyone who has been in both countries for a day. Also, demographically, vegetarians in the States tend to be richer, so duh.

    While I’m on this rant, Anglo-Saxons, probably through their unfortunate traditionally unappetizing diet, don’t seem to enjoy food for their flavour, except for the gourmet minority. When English speaking people discuss food, it’s often about vegetarianism, organic/humane farming practices, price, and volume, but flavour doesn’t seem to top the list as often as in other cultures, especially here in Japan where flavour is paramount. This might partially explain the English speaking gaijins’ amazement about all the TV programs in Japan that are devoted to food. Subtle flavouring also seem to elude those that grew up on blunt flavours, that’s unfortunate. I’m by no means a gourmet, but I appreciate good food when I get a chance to enjoy some, instead of nitpicking over whether there are any animal products in it, how it was farmed, etc.

    Yeah, you can be super-picky, but taste doesn’t matter eh:

    Wil Shipley, a Seattle software developer, uses his iPhone at the Whole Foods fish counter to check websites for updates on which seafood is the most environmentally correct to purchase. He quizzes the staff on where and how a fish was caught. Because he carries the Internet with him, “I can be super-picky,” he said.

    (via Stuff White People Like  :P  )

     

     

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