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  • Posts Tagged ‘beijing’

    Bolt 9.58!!

    Posted by japanstats on 2009 August 17日 Monday

    Usain Bolt demolishes the 100m world record that he set exactly a year ago at the Beijing Olympics by sprinting an unthinkable 9.58 in the 100m finals at the World Athletics Championship Berlin 2009. How fast was this final where 7 out of 8 sprinters clocked in at 10.00 or faster? Tyson Gay now holds the world record amongst all non-Bolt sprinters at 9.71.

    ウサイン・ボルトがまたまたやりました!今度はベルリン世界陸上の100m決勝を9.58秒で世界新!奇しくも去年北京五輪で世界を驚愕させた日から丁度一年後です。すげー、凄すぎる。どんだけ速いんだよ、この決勝?8人中7人が10.00秒以下。ゲイはボルト以外では人類最速の9.71秒です。

    bolt

    1 4 656 Usain Bolt JAM 9.58 (WR) 0.146
    2 5 1183 Tyson Gay USA 9.71 (NR) 0.144
    3 6 665 Asafa Powell JAM 9.84 (SB) 0.134
    4 3 111 Daniel Bailey ANT 9.93 0.129
    5 8 1116 Richard Thompson TRI 9.93 (SB) 0.119
    6 1 492 Dwain Chambers GBR 10.00 (SB) 0.123
    7 2 1110 Marc Burns TRI 10.00 (SB) 0.165
    8 7 1215 Darvis Patton USA 10.34 0.149

    Posted in 01_日本語, 02_English, information, olympics, opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

    WBC uniform watch

    Posted by japanstats on 2009 April 3日 Friday

    I’m sure many people noticed this, but some WBC uniforms are alarmingly similar to MLB uniforms. Guess that’s template at work (and lack of creative colour schemes due to flag colours, though not every nation adheres to their flag stripes). Anyways, without further ado, here they are:

    Australia

    wbc_australia_h

    South Africa

    wbc_sa_h

    It was difficult to tell them apart on quick glance, especially since they played in the same pool in Mexico City.

    wbc_sa_v

    Oakland Athletics

    mlb_oak_h

    mlb_oak_v2

    Different font, obviously, but pretty similar otherwise.

    Canada (home)

    wbc_canada_h1

    LAnaheim Angels

    mlb_laa_h

    Canada has the faux vest thing going.

    Canada (away)

    wbc_canada_v

    Arizona Diamondbacks

    Cardinals Diamondbacks Baseball

    Reverse the font colouring, and you’re basically there.

    Dominican Republic

    wbc_dr_h

    wbc_dr_v

    Future Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez pitching for his homeland, earning a job with the Mets in the process.

    Texas Rangers

    mlb_tx_h3

    mlb_tx_v

    There’s that annoying underarm panel in many WBC jerseys, and the helmet bill’s different colour, but otherwise…

    Italy

    wbc_italy_v2

    LA Dodgers

    mlb_dodg_v3

    (Immortal Manny at work)

    Obviously. Was this done because of the Piazza-Lasorda connection from the first WBC?

    Netherlands (the Cinderella!)

    wbc_ned_h

    Baltimore Orioles

    mlb_bal_h

    Cap colours need to be reversed, and MLB teams seem to be fond of cursive fonts while WBC unis tend to use block fonts.

    Now for the more far fetched connections after this jump

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, information, MLB, opinion, random | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

    Honkbal!!

    Posted by japanstats on 2009 March 11日 Wednesday

    Hot on the heels of the Dutch baseball team’s second triumph over the superstar studded Dominincan Republic team in the last four days in the WBC, I’ve been busy for the last couple of hours reading the Canadutch blog by the Netherlands team pitcher and Vancouver native Leon Boyd… instead of working on my taxes. Yeah, procrastination. Anyways, an interesting behind the scenes athlete blog for those interested in baseball where its played as a minor sport, with a little Canadian flavour, and if you go back far enough the Beijing Olympics and their pre-Games preparation in Korea posts are neat too.

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, opinion, random | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

    WBC Opens

    Posted by japanstats on 2009 March 6日 Friday

    But Japan only beats China 4-0 (Japan Times) (box score).

    murata

    Some thoughts:

    • China’s definitely improving, their pitchers seemed much less like batting practice pitchers this time around, but their play on the field was still sloppy from time to time. Japanese baserunning was sloppy too though.
    • Darvish was pulled with less than 50 pitches so he’s eligible to pitch again in the Asia Round.. but unless he manages to gain command of some of his breaking pitches with the WBC ball, he’s not going to be too useful just with his fastball.
    • Murata bashed a homerun, and he’ll be useful in the Asia Round in the friendly confines of the Tokyo Dome, but his big swings aren’t gonna become homeruns in Petco Park and Dodger Stadium which are pitcher’s parks. Ideally I’d like to see Hara try Uchikawa at first and Ogasawara at third, but this probably won’t happen unless Murata is a total disaster, and with this homerun he’s secured third base for himself even if he’s useless once the team travels across the Pacific.
    • Nakajima and Fukudome showed great plate discipline, but they needed guys behind them to drive them in. Super free swinger Johjima also managed to draw a walk. Japan left 24(!) runners on base, so even though they had the same number of hits as the Chinese, the game wasn’t as close as the score indicated.
    • Ichiro went 0 for 5 and looked horrible at the plate. But then again he didn’t start hitting in 2006 until the games moved to the States, and he’s a notorious slow starter even in regular MLB seasons (he seems to really start hitting in June).
    • Kyuji Fujikawa closed out the game, but his fastball wasn’t up to his usual velocity. If he doesn’t gain velocity, he’ll be an easy target for the sluggers from the Americas (but not A-Rod).
    • Japan now awaits the winner of the Taiwan-Korea game tonight. Taiwan has a depleted roster with major leaguers and half the CPBL players missing (2 of 4 teams didn’t release the players). So, it should be Korea pulling through, but stranger things have happened in baseball (China pulling a fairy dust extra innings upset over Taiwan at the Beijing Olympics, for one).
    • Koreans are going to get to see WBC games on free TV thanks to a last minute deal between the rights holder and TV stations. Korea seems to take a similar approach to big ticket sporting events where multiple TV stations share broadcasting rights. This time around TV Asahi has exclusive rights for the Tokyo Round, and TBS has exclusive rights from round 2 to the finals (though pay sports channel J Sports will show all WBC games). In 2006, NTV was also in the mix, and it’s surprising that they’re not this time around considering that Yomiuri is a sponsor for the event and a group company.
    • If the over/under for tonight’s Korea-Taiwan attendance is 20,000, I’ll take under  😛

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, information, MLB, NPB, olympics, opinion, tokyo | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

    Japan’s WBC 2009 Manager

    Posted by japanstats on 2008 September 3日 Wednesday

    It looks like the new NPB commissioner, and former diplomat, Ryozo Kato is doing the sensible thing to avoid appointing Senichi Hoshino as the manager of Team Japan for the World Baseball Classic 2009. Hoshino failed miserably in player selection (taking along too many injured players or those having subpar seasons like Abe, and not taking players who were in top form such as Matsunaka and Iwakuma) and ingame management (unfathomable dedication to Iwase who is clearly starting his decline or having an off year, but he was used in high leverage situations, playing many players out of position, hardly using Darvish or Uehara, etc.) Hopefully this means that someone other than Hoshino will become the manager, anyone’s got to be better than him (well, maybe not Nakahata).

    From Kyodo via Japanball.com:

    ”We all agreed it is necessary to have a strong team that can
    win in the WBC,” said Kato, adding that he plans to get opinions
    from several sources in the selection process, including Softbank
    Hawks skipper Sadaharu Oh.

    There has been some talk of Senichi Hoshino leading the national
    team, but Japan finished in a disappointing fourth place with Hoshino
    at the helm at this summer’s Beijing Olympics.

    And from Yomiuri:

    “It’s important for me to seek the opinion of knowledgeable and respected people, take that into consideration and then make the decision as soon as possible,” Kato told reporters after a meeting of Nippon Professional Baseball’s board of directors.

    Japan Olympic manager Senichi Hoshino had been the front-runner for the job, but the position is now up for grabs after his team finished a disappointing fourth in Beijing.

    Oh is not in the running because of health reasons.

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, information, olympics, opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

    Oh and Nomura on Hoshino Japan

    Posted by japanstats on 2008 August 25日 Monday

    The day after Team Japan failed miserably out of Beijing Olympic baseball competition by losing to the US in the bronze medal game, NPB resumed action after a short 2 day Olympic finals break. But its been rainy lately in Japan, and many games were cancelled, including the first meetup with the Japanesebaseball.com guys we had planned for the Tigers-Swallows game at Jingu Stadium, and the Hawks-Eagles matchup up in Sendai.

    Once the game was officially cancelled at Sendai, Sadaharu Oh went to pay a visit to Katsuya Nomura, both legendary players and managers in NPB history. With the press present, naturally, the talk quickly turned to why manager Senichi Hoshino‘s team failed to even medal, let alone gold.

    Here’s a snippet of their conversation as reported by Sports Hochi.

    Nomura: Olympics was a failure, wasn’t it?

    Oh: Yes, it was disappointing. It’s difficult. One loss means it’s all over.

    Nomura: It’s difficult to select players. The heart of the order, 3-4-5 hitters need to be solid.

    Oh: It’s always difficult for batters when they face new pitchers for the first time. But ours (Tsuyoshi Wada and Toshiya Sugiuchi) got hit pretty hard. (Comment: Wada and Sugiuchi both pitched 2 games each, Wada 4.82 ERA in 9 1/3 IP and Sugiuchi 0.84 ERA in 10 2/3 IP, so it was only Wada who got hit moderately hard. Olympic stats here.)

    Earlier before Oh’s visit Nomura had already criticized Hoshino Japan, that the team was “unable to make use of all its data. Totally wasted a good thing there. I thought things got off to a bad start when they chose a group of friends to manage the team (Hoshino is friends with coaches Tabuchi and Yamamoto). Managers who used to be pitchers don’t know what position players go through either.” (Comment: Hoshino pitched for the Dragons, peaking in the 70’s.) Oh also commented on the overall team strengths of Korea, Cuba, and USA.

    Oh: They didn’t swing at any balls. Great plate discipline. Once again, we saw how important great batting eyes are. (Comment: says the man who has NPB leading 2390 career walks and an astounding .446 career OBP. At Beijing Japan only walked 24 times, other teams were Canada 15, Cuba 37, Korea 30, Taiwan 30, and USA 34.)

    Nomura: The batters swing without taking big steps.

    Oh: They wait for the ball, and still get distance on the balls they hit.

    Nomura: Different muscles.

    Oh: It’s difficult for starters to pitch relief. Though, I understand that it’s also difficult to select middle relievers on Team Japan… and on top of that the roster size is only 24 players. (Comment: MLB is 25, while NPB uses a 28 man roster with lots of leeway.)

    Nomura: Kids these days are weak. They have the gall take 10 days off by fouling pitches off themselves. I didn’t want to lose my job, so I even played with broken bones.

    Oh: Well, we are 1st and 2nd in all time games played so we were tough, but there are players who give in easily to pain.

    Nomura: You are a man of integrity. I lack integrity. That there shows up in our difference of 200 homeruns. (Comment: 868 v 657 career homruns for the two living legends.)

    The two talked for 40 minutes, but these were the quotes that made it onto Sports Hochi. World’s homerun king Oh, of course, has also led the champion Team Japan in WBC 2006. And Nomura, the greatest hitting catcher in NPB history, managed Cuban manager at Beijing, Antonio Pacheco, when he played at Shidax in the Japanese industrial leagues. Oh has been to the Japan Series 4 times as manager and won twice, Nomura 5 times and won three times. (Comment: Hoshino has been to the Japan Series 3 times as manager but has never won it.)

    Note: This is not a word for word translation, but I’ll reprint the original article here before it disappears from the archives.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in 02_English, 03_Translations (英訳ポートフォリオ), baseball, information, olympics, opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

    2008.8.22 Olympic Baseball Semis (and Bolt, of course)

    Posted by japanstats on 2008 August 23日 Saturday

    Japan lost soundly to Korea, again, this time 2-6, thanks to the team’s inept offence combined with completely mismanagement of the bullpen bringing in struggling Hitoki Iwase into the highest leverage situation (2-2 tie in the 8th) in the game, then following it up not with closer Uehara to stop the bleeding, but somehow bringing back Hideaki Wakui who had pitched 7 innings 3 days earlier, he gave up 2 more runs. Kyuji Fujikawa’s forkball didn’t drop as much and was hit into the outfield to tie the game at 2. The struggling Lee Seung-Yeop was heroic in his 2 run homer off Iwase that brought the lead for the Koreans, reminiscent of struggling Kosuke Fukudome’s pinch hit HR against Korea in the WBC semifinals that won the game for Japan (after losing to the Koreans twice in earlier rounds, history didn’t repeat itself in Beijing). But the star of the game was 20 year old Korean pitcher Kim Kwang-hyun who pitched 8 solid innings, completely shutting down the Japanese offence in the second half of the game. For better accounts of the game, here’re the EWC and NPBTracker takes on the game. Oh, and the US was crushed 10-2 by Cuba in the other regional arch rival semifinals.

    Well, I’m busy tomorrow evening for the finals tomorrow morning to see what Cuba’s got up its sleeve, but I’ll be able to catch the Darvish-Wada show vs the US as Japan hopes to scrape together a bronze.

    But Japan got lucky on the track, to counterbalance the baseball disappointment. With the US and UK relay teams dropping their batons, literally, in the 4x100m relay semifinals, Japan was in line for bronze in the finals. And the relay team brought home the first Japanese track medal in 80 years! Well done, lads. (This was in the shadows of Jamaica’s amazing WR relay and some guy named Bolt’s 3rd WR gold medal.)

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, information, olympics, opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

    Out of the Olympic Limelight (kinda)

    Posted by japanstats on 2008 August 21日 Thursday

    From 20 August.

    Japan’s Takayuki Matsumiya failed to qualify in his 5000m heat. That in itself is nothing special but take a look at this picture.

    Yup, missing left shoe. In the jostling for positions midrace he came in contact with another runner and his left shoe partially came off, so he just took it off entirely and decided to run with one barefoot, that must’ve been odd and probably painful, as he’s no Abebe Bikila, but he completed his heat.

    In other Olympic news, Paulie Walnuts of the Sopranos has been located in Beijing, and CCTV only paid about $9m for the broadcast rights for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, they should expect to pay more than 10 times as much for the upcoming Olympics with it going into triple ($100m) figures.

    In baseball action, Japan and the US faced eachother to determine who will have to play Cuba in the semifinals (the winner of the game gaining that unnecessary honour). US won 4-2 with the new extra innings rule, taking advantage of Hitoki Iwase’s 2nd inning of work. Darvish started the game and pitched 2 innings, followed by Tanaka for 5 innings. Expect this to be the end of 19 year old Tanka’s 2008 Olympic experience (and he probably gained some valuable experience for WBC 2009), and also expect to see Darvish in the semifinal game against rivals Korea, as he looked good striking out 3 Americans on the way to completing 2 perfect innings (and Hoshino will most likely dare not bring Darvish back out against Cuba if they meet in the medal game). This sets up the semifinals nicely with two regional rivalries in Korea v Japan (10:30) and Cuba v USA (18:00) on the 22nd Friday.

    Oh yeah, Usain Bolt became a double world record gold medallist in premier sprinting events of 100m and 200m, the latter with the 19.30 time besting another sprinter with a distinctive, and very different upright, form in Michael Johnson who was a 200m and 400m specialist.

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, culture, information, olympics, opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

    Olympic Reading

    Posted by japanstats on 2008 August 19日 Tuesday

    Some slightly off the beaten track Olympic reading material.

    Salon’s Gary Kamiya, a fellow Japanese half-blood and a writer that I usually enjoy, with Short people got no reason to live after Usain Bolt’s crazy 9.69 100m.

    Bolt’s race was one of the freakiest events in the history not just of the Olympics but of track and field. The 6’5″ Jamaican simply redefined speed. Not only did he destroy one of the fastest fields in Olympic history and shatter his own world record, he did it with a gut stuffed full of Chicken McNuggets, with one shoe untied and while signing autographs, blowing kisses and taking a nap during the last 20 meters of the race. As the great retired Trinidadian sprinter Ato Boldon, winner of four Olympic medals, said during NBC’s broadcast, “This has never been seen before in Olympic history.”

    The Telegraph takes a look at ex-Olympic sports like cricket (which may start lobbying for its reappearance in the form of the new baseballish Twenty20 form, fittingly enough, for the 2020 Olympics), polo, motorboat racing, rugby, tug o’ war (which lasted several Olympics amazingly enough), and how baseball is gaining membership in this exclusive club of sports.

    The tug’o war is a favourite of mine, simply for the stories involved. The USA had to withdraw from the 1900 event because three of its members were involved in the men’s hammer, while Danish journalist Edgar Aaybe went along to watch a combined Sweden and Denmark team against France in the final, was asked to stand in for an athlete who fell ill and duly won gold before filing his undeniably exclusive copy.

    There’s more. The 1908 event ended in uproar when the Liverpool Police side, one of Britain’s three representatives, were accused of foul play by the USA for wearing their regulation Police boots, which had cleats and allegedly offered extra grip. The Yanks were not happy and withdrew from the competition and rejected ‘Old Bill’s offer of a rematch in bear feet. Tug o’War was finally put to bed in 1920, when GB won, leaving them as technically the reigning Olympic champions.

    Slate’s keeping track of the Olympic Sap-o-Meter of the NBC coverage, and Michael Phelps helped set a new record.

    On Sunday, it was back to moms, moms, and additional moms, with 18 mentions of motherhood on the day—more than enough to vault mom ahead of front-runner dream to become the sappiest word of the 2008 Olympics to date. Also of note: a record four mentions of tears, several relating to American gymnast Sacramone’s waterworks. A bunch of heroes, hearts, and challenges pushed Sunday over the edge, setting a record of 64 Sap Points that will be hard to beat.

    A Slate ode to weightlifting and Salon’s King Kaufman lament over US men’s basketball team, two of many events not being covered here in Japan in mainstream media because of lack of Japanese entrants.

    Beyond the aesthetic and emotional pull of lifting, I suspect what really got me hooked is the strategy, discussed in detail in this recent New York Times piece. The key point is that the weightlifters (in fact, usually their coaches) choose how much they plan to hoist. Their “bids,” so to speak, are all displayed on a giant board, like a bizarre stock market that trades in kilograms instead of dollars.

    What I mean is the American men’s basketball failure was a fascinating soap opera. It was a Rorschach test for America. In 2004, we had kind of a hangover from the patriotic orgy that followed 9/11. We were in the middle of a vicious presidential campaign season. It was just dawning on a whole lot of us that the war on terror was a phantom, that Iraq — more than a year after “Mission Accomplished” — was a quagmire.

    We Americans told online pollsters that we were rooting in large numbers for our squads to lose. We deserved to be punished, to get ours.

    The men’s basketball team, a thrown-together second- or third-team All-Star squad — remember that many top players begged off because of security concerns — struggled in pre-Olympics exhibitions and kept struggling when the tournament started. Because they were the most famous American Olympians, the most famously failing American Olympians and, not incidentally, a bunch of black men, they became the exemplars for the ugly American. Arrogant. Boorish. Bullying.

    ESPN Page 2’s Jim Caple completed the golden pass decathlon by attending 10 events on Saturday.

    And that is what I hoped to see when I cashed in my golden ticket for its full value Saturday, attending as many events at as many venues in one day as possible. My day began with Michael Phelps tying Mark Spitz and ended with Usain Bolt blowing away the world; in between I saw mystic and marvelous surprises that astonished and perplexed.

    Like, who knew Iran had a basketball team?

    And finally, a couple of Globe and Mail blog entries about hockey and the medals table, wonder if the American media are going to stick with the total medals method even after their country catches up to China in the second week with all the athletics golds (won’t they?)

    Guys, guys: it’s field hockey, not the other kind.

    Two Canadians on our field hockey team, Bindi Kullar and Sukhwinder Singh, have just been banned one match for a bit of the old ultra-violence in a game versus Great Britain.

    In an explanation that deserves a gold medal for euphemism, an official said “Singh’s stick made contact with Kirkham’s forehead, causing bruising.” As for Kullar, he apparently stickhandled an opponent’s chin.

    This method – counting gold medals, not total medals – seems to be the established model across the world, including at this website, the website for the CBC, the BBC, British newspapers and other sundry sites we checked including Die Welt of Germany, The Australian and Le Figaro of France. Even China’s arch-rival Japan seems content with the method that shows China in the lead, at least on the site for Japan Times and the Kyodo news service. The China Daily and Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post also follow this model, though that’s probably because they know what’s good for them.

    Now turn your attention to the U.S. media to see who’s on top in the medals standings. Turns out the rest of the world is dead wrong and that what counts is not gold medals, but total medals. NBC, the official Olympics broadcaster, has the U.S. on top. So does the “paper of record” New Tork Times, Washington Post, USA Today, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Chicago Tribune and sports sites ESPN.com, Fox Sports and SI.com. We havent yet found one US-based site that is following the officially-sanctioned model which has China in the lead.

    Funnily enough, we did manage to find a very rare supporter of the U.S.-first method from outside the American media. Al-Jazeera’s website, we kid you not, has a medal table with the U.S. sitting proudly on top. Could a detente in the clash of civlizations be far behind?

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, hockey, olympics, opinion, random | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

    Koshien Final and more Olympic Baseball

    Posted by japanstats on 2008 August 17日 Sunday

    Well, my team in Koshien, Okinawa’s Urasoe-Sho, got bombed out 9-4 in the semifinals by hard hitting Tokoha-Kikugawa (Shizuoka) based on their 9 run 2nd inning. The team had engineered 10 and 7 run innings to win their previous 2 games as well, showing the Japanese baseball world how big ball can be played and that, yes, you don’t have to always bunt over a runner every time. Kikugawa will face Osaka-Toin (Osaka) who also won comfortably 9-4 over Yokohama (South Kanagawa) in this final-worthy matchup. Toin has looked stronger as the tournament goes on, defeating better opponents with ever more ease. The finals will pit upstart Kikugawa against hometown Toin in what should be a slugfest (but will probably turn into a pitching duel against all expectations, as these things tend to do) at 12:30pm on Monday 18 August.

    Incompetently managed (both on and off the field) Japan also lost to Korea in Olympic baseball action (boxscore). A pretty resounding 5-3 defeat. I don’t even know where to start on this one, but I’ll list some of the shortcomings of Team Japan as managed by Senichi Hoshino (who has never won the Japan Series as manager, and indeed there might be a reason why).

    • Despite the limited 24 man roster (NPB uses an expansive 28 man roster), the team took injury question marks Kawasaki and Murata with them to Beijing. Nishioka’s injury on top of this didn’t help matters, as the team was down to 11 position players at full health for the Korea game (though Murata played).
    • This forced Hoshino’s hand and he started all glove no bat Araki at second and solid hitting catcher Satozaki at DH. These wouldn’t normally be bad decisions except he let Araki hit second even though he is by far the worst hitter on the team (classic old school baseball move). And for some unknown reason he, yet again, let incompetent Abe catch instead of the defensively superior Satozaki catch, and this cost the team a run when Abe’s errant throw to second scored a Korean run.
    • Hoshino also left pitchers in too long in the game, with pretty good relief corps, he should’ve pulled Wada earlier in the inning, and he has admitted to this mistake. And he also left reliever Iwase in for too long even though he is clearly more hittable this year and is not a shutdown reliever like he used to be (or like Fujikawa, who didn’t get to enter the game).

    Good news is that, despite Hoshino’s bumbling management, the team still has a decent chance of making medal rounds due to Canada always coming up just short (tough 1 run losses to Cuba, USA, and Korea), and Taiwan recording their first ever loss to China in pixy dust extra inning rules (China might be onto something though, as they managed to pull Korea into extra innings as well, though this time they lost 1-0). Korea and Cuba are both unbeaten at 4-0, but Cuba looks like the team to beat. Since Japan still has to play Canada, chances of both teams making it into medal rounds is slim to nil, considering that USA now has a relatively easy schedule having already played the 2 undefeated teams.

    Cuba 4-0

    Korea 4-0

    USA 2-2

    Japan 2-2

    Canada 1-3

    China 1-3

    Netherlands 1-3

    Taiwan 1-3

    This Kuricorder Quartet version of the Imperial March might sum up my feelings pretty well at the moment, after waking up with a hangover from an all you can drink birthday party on the day of those defeats.

    Posted in 02_English, baseball, high school, information, olympics, opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »